What's the Purpose of a Trademark? How is it Used?

LEGAL DISCLAIMER: The following information is provided to be just general information, and therefore, should not be taken as specific legal advice that pertains to any particular situation.  The reader should not base any decisions on the information here to act or refrain from acting regarding a legal problem.  If you believe you have a legal problem please seek legal advice from a licensed attorney in the relevant jurisdiction. ------------------------------------------------------

So it’s amazing how time flies when you have a lot of work to do.  I have been very grateful for these past couple of months for the clients that have come through my door (or via electronic means), but more work means less time for blogging and sharing information to all you interested soon-to-be or current business owners.

Anyway, as some people know I was fortunate last month to attend the American Bar Association’s Annual Conference in San Francisco.  I attended many Intellectual Property, Business Law, and a couple of Employment Law seminars.  When I can, I will update my blog or provide one-sheet resources on the information I obtained from these seminars to share with all of you.

So today’s post is about the use of trade and service marks.  A prior Draw the Law post covered the difference between a trade name and trademark and I have a one-sheet on What is Trademark?.

Purpose of Marks

Before we get to the using of a trademarks, let’s first consider that the purpose of a trademark.  The point of a trademark is to distinguish one company’s set of goods and/or services from another company’s.  Basically, it is meant to avoid confusion to consumers, so they can readily ascertain from the mark which company the goods and/or services are originating from.

So How are Marks Used in Commerce?

A mark can be used on goods (products), which would make it technically a “trademark”.  Specifically, this would mean the mark is applied, engraved, embroidered directly on the goods, POS displays, the use of labels or tags affixed to the good, or shipping labels when sending the goods through commerce.  It is not just merely advertising, but must have a Point of Sale component.

In the case of a mark used in connection with services, clearly there is no tangible part to a service.  Therefore, service marks are found on websites, brochures, advertising (but not printer’s proofs), on or at locations associated with the services, such as vehicles used with the service, or on the uniforms of employees while they perform the service.

How do I Properly Use my Trademark?

You can use ℠ for service marks, ™ for trademarks, and registered trademark symbol (the 'R' that has a circle around it) ONLY for registered marks (it is a violation of the law to use the registered symbol when your mark is NOT registered).  Further, the mark should be distinguished from regular text, through the use of quotation marks, larger print, all capital letters, or through colorization of the wording.  Also your grammar lessons are important for trademark usage.  A noun should ALWAYS follow a mark.  The mark should NEVER be used as a verb.  For example, it is a XEROX copier and NOT xeroxing. Or perfect for the web as another example, it is NOT you googled the answer, but it is rather you ran a GOOGLE search.  Finally, the correct spelling should be used and moreover, the mark should not be pluralized.

The point of all this proper usage is to avoid a loss in rights in the mark.  Many trademarks of famous brands have become generic, and generic terms are not entitled to trademark protection.  Consider that the word "escalator" used to be a registered trademark, but the Otis Elevator Company has lost that mark due to it becoming generic.  Therefore, you should be actively policing your trademark usage and avoid losing rights that you worked so hard to create with your brand.

That’s it for this time.  I hope to be back soon with more information to share.

Mahalo for stopping by!

-RKH